Graduate 2016: A pushchair with longer life

Date
22.02.2016
Category
Education and students

Maybe tomorrow’s pushchair will not end up on the rubbish tip when the children have outgrown it. Using modular construction, the designer Christoffer Kronholm Petersen has created the so-called Multi Stroller that can be used for various practical purposes.

What is your graduation project about?
In all simplicity, my graduation project is about making life a little easier for parents in and around towns and cities. 

The Multi Stroller is a rethinking of the classic pushchair, but instead of just transporting a child, the Multi Stroller can do much more. The sky is the limit, when it comes to designing a multifunctional product using modules. 

The Multi Stroller can be used to pick up a child from the nursery and for shopping on the way home. The next day you can use it on the golf course for carrying golf clubs around.

The cornerstone of the project is the framework that constitutes the Multi Stroller. It is designed so you can click on various kinds of modules as and when required. That means you do not have to buy several different vehicles for different uses. Instead you can just exchange the modules on the frame. 

The Multi Stroller is also slightly narrower than other pushchairs, making it possible to access more places: for example, through underground systems (mostly abroad), up escalators, narrow aisles in shops and many more. 

The project has really aimed at simplifying the pushchair” and making it more manageable for the user. It also involves the design of a frame that is radically different from other products on the market.

The cornerstone of the project is the framework that constitutes the Multi Stroller. It is designed so you can click on various kinds of modules as and when required. That means you do not have to buy several different vehicles for different uses. Instead you can just exchange the modules on the frame.

The Multi Stroller is also slightly narrower than other pushchairs, making it possible to access more places: for example, through underground systems (mostly abroad), up escalators, narrow aisles in shops and many more.

The project has really aimed at simplifying the pushchair” and making it more manageable for the user. It also involves the design of a frame that is radically different from other products on the market.

 

What would your graduation project mean for society, if it were realised?
Before I embarked upon the project I had no idea how to administer cardiac massage or what a difference you can make by intervening if you witness a cardiac arrest. My hope is that the project, if realised, would help raise awareness on the subject and give others the courage to intervene and help save lives. I think that, by conveying such a serious topic in new ways, we can raise greater awareness about how we can help each other as civilians, and that we are able to overcome some of the barriers that restrain us today. 

What is your strength as a designer?
My strength as a designer is that I am curious and good at communicating. I have a creative approach to the challenges I face and I am passionate about communicating in forms, words and images that relate to a variety of purposes and people. 

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
When I look back over the last five years as a student, I think I have developed immensely. I have been pleasantly surprised by all the options my discipline offers. And I have encountered fascinating cultures and people. I hope that in five years’ time I can look back on my first years as a graduate in the same way.

Right now I am working as a graphic designer and illustrator on a newspaper, where I enjoy working in a printed medium, while also helping to develop several digital stories and vivid images. I see myself working more in this field in five years’ time and working with the graphic medium in all sorts of formats and expressions.